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Dentist Destroyed My Smile

I have some abrasion lesions that my dentist decided to help me repair after much begging. Now I think I may have made a mistake. I had a beautiful smile with the exception of the lesions– emphasis on had.

We did dental bonding on the teeth at the gumline and nothing matches. The color my dentist put on there is way too dark and opaque compared to the rest of my teeth. My friends that have seen it have all been quietly polite, but I have noticed the double takes. Is it safe to remove this and have it done by someone else?

Candace

Dear Candace,

I’m sorry you are in this position. This is just one example of why I always tell people who write to not pressure their dentist into a procedure, even a procedure like this one, which should be within their skill set.

Image of a tooth with abrasion lesions

The image directly above is for the benefit of those who may not know what abrasion lesions are. A dentist can simply remove the dental bonding that was done and put new bonding on. I don’t think your dentist is going to be able to do this.

Though technically, with this procedure, any dentist should be able to do it, in most cases of real cosmetic dentistry work, like a smile makeover, you’d need a dentist who has invested in a lot of post-doctral training. As you are going to need another dentist to fix this anyway, I suggest you get the best cosmetic dentist you can. This way you won’t have to worry about another disaster. AACD accredited dentists are in the top 1% of their field. I’d start there.

If you don’t have one in a reasonably close proximity to you, my next stop would be mynewsmile.com. A retired accredited dentist pre-screens every practicioner who wants to be listed. They can’t just pay to get on. Instead, they have to prove their technical knowledge and skill as well as show their artistry. Anyone listed on that site will do a phenomenal job for you.

A Word about Your Dental Bonding

We used to think the reason for abrasion lesions was brushing too aggressively. The latest research, however, seems to indicate it is more the result of someone who clenches their teeth a lot. Clenching makes the teeth flex somewhat at the gumline, this in turn weakens the tooth there and leads to the abrasions.

Because of the flexing, I’m going to recommend you ask your dentist to use a softer, flexible composite bonding material. Otherwise, with a hard material, it could lead to your bonding popping out.

You may also consider having your dentist offer you a custom nightguard. This will help protect your teeth from clenching and grinding, though the night when you are least likely to notice it.

This blog is brought to you by Salem, MA Dentist Dr. Randall Burba .