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New Denture Won’t Stay In

I’ve had a new denture for a month. He did an impression, a wax bite, and two wax try-ins. Even after the second wax try-in, they weren’t staying in, but he said that’s because it’s not the real denture. But, when the real dentures came, it still didn’t want to stay in. At first, my dentist suggested I give it time for my gums to adjust. When that didn’t work, he did some grinding. That didn’t help either. Now he’s talking about a reline. Will that help any more than the others or is it another useless step?

Marcy

Dear Marcy,

Dentures

I’m sorry you are having so much trouble with your denture. I don’t know why your dentist suggested your gums would adjust. That wouldn’t happen. Your gums are what they are. The best I can think is it was a stalling tactic. The big problem with this fit seems to be he skipped a step. However, dentists commonly do this. Most of the time it results in a decent fitting denture. In yours, it didn’t.

When the impression is made, we’re taught to do a two-step impression. First, with a heavy impression material and then with a light material. Some dentists will just do a one-step with a medium material. This is to save money. Most people who get dentures are looking for the lowest cost solution. Doing a one-step impression allows them to charge less, bringing in more business.

The reline should help with the fit quite a bit. This is a better step to take than the others you’ve had done so far. If he hasn’t done the new impression yet, make sure you ask him to do a two-step, which he should have done to begin with.

The Danger with Dentures

Even the best fitting dentures will reduce your chewing capacity by 50%, so I wouldn’t expect the secure feel you are used to with your natural teeth, though of course, they should actually stay in.

There is a bigger problem with dentures, though. When your teeth were removed, your body recognized that. In a continual effort to be efficient with its resources, your body will resorb the minerals in your jawbone to use elsewhere in your body where it deems they’d be more useful.

The big problem this causes is the gradual shrinking of your jawbone. Eventually, you won’t have enough jawbone left for you retain your denture. This is known as facial collapse. There is a way to prevent this.

If you get implant overdentures, it tricks your body into thinking you still have teeth and will preserve your jawbone.

This blog is brought to you by Salem, MA Dentist Dr. Randall Burba.