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Problem Speaking After Porcelain Veneers

I had ten porcelain veneers put on ten teeth. Ever since then, I have had trouble speaking. I’m not sure what to do. It feels like the backs of my teeth are too thick and my tongue is pushed. It’s making me talk weird. My dentist has no idea what is wrong. Have you heard of this?

Brooke

Dear Brooke,

A single porcelain veneer being held up by a dental instrument

Looking at the image of porcelain veneers above, you can see that it doesn’t have any part of it that goes on the back of your teeth. It won’t affect your speech there. However, there are some dentists who place porcelain crowns and tell their patients it is porcelain veneers. If they surround your teeth, they’re crowns. If they just go on the front of your teeth, they’re porcelain veneers. Sometimes the length of porcelain veneers can affect your speech, but you said it was bothering you from the back. That’s not the same.

If it turns out he place crowns, then he’s not only been dishonest, he’s also thrown off your bite. If that’s what happened, you can get him to pay for these to be re-done by a dentist who has both cosmetic dentistry training (preferably someone who is an AACD accredited dentist) as well has having done post-doctoral TMJ training. That’s the kind of dentist who will know how to repair the bite’s position as well as give you a beautiful smile.

Another possibility is your dentist did place porcelain veneers and the thick feeling in your tongue is completely unrelated. You could have had an allergic reaction to something and that is why you’re having trouble speaking.

How Can You Get Help

The first thing I would do is get a second opinion. I again suggest going to a skilled cosmetic dentist. There is a trick to this, though. Dentists know each other. They are one another’s peer group. So one dentist might hesitate to say something unkind about work their friend did.

This is why you won’t tell them who did the work. First, ask him if you received porcelain veneers or dental crowns. Then, ask him if he knows why you’re having trouble speaking. If he asks for the name of the dentist tell him, you want a blind, unbiased second opinion so you won’t be sharing any names.

This blog is brought to you by Salem, MA Cosmetic Dentist Dr. Randall Burba.