Tag Archives: all porcelain crowns

Dentist Insisting I Get Invisalign

I feel horrible about my teeth and now my dentist has made me feel even worse about both that and my finances. I have two crowns on my front teeth. They’re 16 years old so they are in definite need of replacing. When I went to see my dentist about that, he insisted I have Invisalign done first before he would replace the crowns. The front teeth do stick out a little, not a ton. I”m ashamed to say I don’t have the money to do both procedures. If I do the Invisalign, I won’t be able to replace the crowns, but my dentist won’t replace them without straightening my teeth first. What do I do?

Miriam

Dear Miriam,

Clear Invisalgin Aligner
Invisalign’s aligners are invisible, even at a conversational distance.

I’m very sorry your dentist has placed you in this position. It is unfair of him to insist on perfect cases or nothing. I am going to tell you now that this isn’t the best dentist for you. I’d like you to look for another one. In your case, I’d like you to look for an expert cosmetic dentist.

Your crowns can be replaced with or without you doing Invisalign. In fact, you can get your crowns replaced and then do Invisalign later if you’d like. It’s completely up to you. It is obvious to anyone with a brain the teeth can have dental crowns, even with their slight overbite, because you already have them.

What Type of Dentist Should you Get

crowned front teeth without all-porcelain crowns and then with

You are replacing your front teeth which is one of the first things people notice about you. You’ll want a dentist who understands both the technical aspects of your procedure but also has an artistic eye. This way you may get a beautiful smile. Plus, you can be assured a dentist with the right skills and training will know to only place all-porcelain crowns on your front teeth.

The image above, on the left side, shows teeth with metal-based crowns on the front teeth. The right side shows that same patient who had their dental crowns replaced with all-porcelain crowns. You can see what a beautiful smile a great cosmetic dentist is able to create.

I’d look for an AACD accredited dentist in your area. If you can’t find one. Try mynewsmile.com. Any dentist they recommend is excellent.

This blog is brought to you by Salem, MA Dentist Dr. Randall Burba.

Is a Cracked Porcelain Crown a Dental Emergency?

I had several porcelain crowns placed on my front teeth. They’ve served me well for over fifteen years. One has always had a minor defect you couldn’t see just by looking. My dentist told me about it and offered to do a different crown, but she did say that even our natural teeth have minor defects and it shouldn’t be a problem. I appreciated her honesty and her willingness to make an entire new one. I didn’t feel that was necessary and their longevity has born that out. Today, however, I noticed I can both see and feel the defect. I’m sure it needs to be replaced at this point, I’m just wondering if it is a dental emergency or I can wait. The original dentist has since retired and her replacement and I are just getting to know one another so I don’t yet have the same confidence in her.

Lindsey

Dear Lindsey,

A Dental Crown being Placed

It sounds like you and your old dentist had a wonderful doctor-patient relationship. It’s certainly hard to lose a trusted caregiver. Hopefully, her replacement will end up being equally honest and skilled. While this change in your dental crown isn’t necessarily a dental emergency, I don’t want you to get too comfortable and let this slide. You do need to be seen.

The fact that you can now see and feel the defect tells me it’s cracked. It will at some point completely break. Those type of things inevitably happen at the worst possible moments, like when you’re on vacation or out to dinner. It’s much better for you to get this dealt with well before it can become an emergency issue. Plus, it will give you peace of mind knowing it’s no longer at risk of breaking.

Who Should Replace Your Dental Crown?

You’re not familiar with your new dentist yet, so before you allow her to replace your porcelain crown, you will need to research her cosmetic skill. At the very least check out her smile gallery. It’s a collection of before and after pictures of cosmetic work she’s done. You can click here to look at Dr. Burba’s work to get an idea of the type of quality you want. These are front teeth so you want them to be beautiful when you smile.

Some dentists would try to persuade you to replace all the crowns so as to make them easier to match. That’s usually a sign they’re not top-notch cosmetic dentists. The crowns are aging, so if you want to go ahead and replace all of them, that’s fine. But, you mentioned they’re still in good shape. In that case, you really only have to replace the broken one.

Replacing a single crown to your remaining teeth takes an expert cosmetic dentist. I’d suggest you look for a dentist who’s reached accreditation level with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. AACD accredited dentists are experts in their field both in technical skill and artistry. They’ll match your crown perfectly.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.

Why Is My Veneer Turning Dark at the Top?

I received two porcelain veneers on my front teeth a couple of years ago. I only needed one but ended up getting two. The dentist said that was necessary to make sure my two front teeth match. It worked out, they matched and looked very nice. I’m concerned because one of them has developed a dark line at the very top. Will this happen to both of them? Is there any way to fix it? It’s a little embarrassing.

Stephanie H.

Dear Stephanie,

Porcelain veneers shouldn’t ever develop a line at the top. There are two possible scenarios, but both mean your dentist didn’t do the job correctly. That actually wouldn’t surprise me because he told you he needed to do two veneers in order to get them to match. If he were a skilled cosmetic dentist that wouldn’t be true. He could match a single veneer to the rest of your teeth.

First, the veneers should have been made flush with your natural tooth. If your dentist didn’t do that, it would leave a ledge which can gather all kinds of food and bacteria. That would be a possible explanation of the dark line. It will also lead to decay so he should repair this free of charge.

A second possibility is the dentist didn’t bond the veneer properly. This allows things to slip in between. This would more likely make the entire veneer look darker. Unfortunately, it also will lead to decay and should be repaired free of charge.

I’d get a second opinion from an expert cosmetic dentist, just to get an objective opinion as to what is going on. Don’t be surprised if he tells you what you actually have are two porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns and not porcelain veneers. Those DO develop a dark line at the gumline as a matter of course, but generally it takes more than two years for that to pop it’s ugly head out. If this is the case it’s just another piece of evidence that your dentist isn’t qualified in cosmetics. Front teeth require all-porcelain crowns. The metal based ones are better for back teeth.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.