Tag Archives: Care Credit

Insurance Problems with Dental Implants

I need some help. I want to get dental implants, but can’t seem to get my medical insurance to cover it. Why wouldn’t they? It’s not like being unable to eat is good for my health? Will dental insurance cover them? If not, what do I do? I’ve heard dentures are bad for someone my age (I’m 52) but that may be all I can afford.

Grannie G.

Dear Grannie G.,

before and after side images of a woman suffering from facial collapse
Gentting dentures at the wrong age can lead to facial collapse

We sometimes forget that insurance companies are a business. As such, they want to make money. They’re not really there to think of the best option for the patient. Because dental insurance is available, medical insurance companies won’t cover anything which has to do with your teeth.

Dental insurance plans tend to cover the least expensive option available. For tooth replacement options, that would be dentures. So, you’re more likely to get most or full coverage of dentures, but only partial coverage of dental implants. That leaves you covering most of the bill.

Whoever advised you about the dangers of getting dentures at your age was correct. When your teeth are removed, your body begins resorbing the minerals in your jawbone to use elsewhere in an effort to be efficient with its resources. This has the unfortunate effect of shrinking your jawbone. Depending on how quickly the resorption takes place, in ten or so years you’ll no longer have enough jawbone left to retain your dentures. This is known in dental circles as facial collapse.

I don’t want you to despair, though, there are ways to afford dental implants.

Affording Dental Implants

Staged Payments

The first thing you should know is payment for the dental implant procedure is usually done in two stages. First, is the surgical stage when the implants are placed. Then, after a period of time designed for both healing and osseointegration to take place.

Once that is done, the second payment is usually made when the implant crowns are designed. This allows you to break up the cost.

For some, even that is too much. Because of that many dentists will work through Care Credit, which allows you to take out a low-interest payment plan in order to get the treatment you need. If you qualify, this company allows you to choose how long you’ll take to repay it, thereby essentially choosing the cost of your payments.

Dental Implant Options

You don’t have to get a one-to-one tooth/implant replacement ratio. It is much more affordable to get implant overdentures which will use four to six implants per arch and then anchor your dentures to them.

If this is still too much money, snap-on dentures are a great option. It will allow you to use as few as two dental implants. It will anchor the denture in that spot and protect the bone where the implants are. This will get you started while allowing you to save up for more implants if you so desire.

This blog is brought to you by Salem, MA Dentist Dr. Randall Burba.

Will an Emergency Dentist Charge the Cause of the Accident?

I was at a stag party. We were at a pub when one of the group got a little too drunk. He started trouble which ended up causing a fight. The result of which was my front tooth lost a piece and is now loose. I’m assuming I need an emergency dentist, but I’m broke. Will the dentist charge the fee to the moron who started all this?

Casey C.

Dear Casey,

A chipped tooth in need of an emergency dentist
Tooth trauma requires an emergency dental visit

I’m very sorry this happened to you. It’s hard when you’re trying to be responsible and the people around you cause problems. You’re right that this needs an emergency dentist. Your loose tooth needs to be splinted to stabilize it. There are several ways a dentist can do this. What method he or she uses will depend on what other issues your tooth is facing.

He’ll also want to examine it for trauma to the nerves or pulp. Internal damage could mean a root canal treatment and possible crown.

Once the tooth is secure, if there’s no other damage you can fix the broken piece with dental bonding. You don’t have to have the piece that broke. A skilled cosmetic dentist can sculpt a composite resin onto your tooth which will look just like your natural tooth structure and blend in perfectly.

Who Pays for Emergency Dental Care?

Unless the person responsible comes and agrees to pay for treatment, the dentist can’t bill him. He can only bill the person receiving the services or their legal guardian without prior approval. However, you can ask for a detailed bill of the damage and send the bill to the offender. If he has integrity he may just pay. If he doesn’t, you may have to take him to small claims court.

Just be aware, many dentists are willing to work with patients financially, especially those in emergency situations. Just talk to the dentist ahead of time. If he’s not willing to work with you, try Care Credit, though most dentists offer that in-office. It’s a medical credit card that has low and even no-interest payments.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.

Store Bought TMJ Treatment

I’m drowning in medical bills right now and don’t think I can afford a dentist. But, my jaw has locked up. My sister says TMJ does that and that I need an oral device to help. All I know is I can’t even eat. I’ve heard you can use an oral mouthguard to treat TMJ. I saw one at the pharmacy the other day and it was only about $20. I can afford that much. Is there anything I need to know about using it?

Drew A.

Dear Drew,

TMJ Treatment Dentist

Your sister is right on both points. Lock-jaw is often caused by TMJ Disorder. While, the orthotic anterior repositioning splint can be used to treat TMJ, that’s not what you saw at the store. A mouthguard is completely different. They’re used to protect people’s teeth from habitual tooth grinding. If that’s an issue you struggle with, you’ll want a mouthguard after you finish your TMJ treatment. However, the store bought ones aren’t custom fit. They just come in small, medium, or large. You can also find a one size fits all. They’re okay on a temporary basis, but you’ll grind through them rather quickly.

One made by your dentist will be more effective. I know your TMJ is the focus right now, but if you don’t protect your teeth from the grinding there are serious consequences. Not only does the grinding aggravate your TMJ, but it can lead to cracked teeth or even teeth coming loose and needing to be replaced. Best case scenario, they end up ground down to nubs and all need to be crowned. Talk about expensive!

But, back to your current issue. Here’s what I’d like you to do in the immediate so we can try to get the swelling down and get you eating again. I’d like you to take 800 mg. of ibuprofen about three times a day. In addition, you need to alternate heat and ice packs. Wear them for about ten minutes at a time, a few times a day as you’re able.

You will need to see a dentist to get the appropriate treatment. I know you’re buried in medical bills right now. Many dentists are compassionate and would be willing to work with you on payments so you can get the treatment you need right away and pay it out later.

Even if you can’t find one willing to work you, Care Credit is a fantastic option. It’s a medical “credit card”, but they let you choose your terms.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.