Tag Archives: Cater to Cowards Dentist

When Is a Gum Problem a Dental Emergency?

My husband has an ache in his mouth. He swears he just nicked it with his fork, but to me, it looks like a pimple. That seems a strange way for a cut to manifest. I think it’s something serious and he thinks I’m over-reacting. Have you seen this before?

Amanda

Dear Amanda,

Illustration of an abscessed tooth

Your husband is going to hate to hear this, but you’re correct. This isn’t from a cut. A pimple on the gums sounds like his tooth is abscessed. This means he had a cavity that went deep enough to affect the pulp of his tooth, turning into an infection.

I’ve got an illustration of this above, When the infection no longer has anywhere to go, it tends to spill out into your gums and form a pimple.

Unlike your typical bacterial infection, with a dental infection, an antibiotic isn’t enough. A dentist has to get in there and physically remove the infected pulp. This is known as a root canal treatment. Often, a crown has to be placed as well because the tooth will become brittle and need to be protected.

An Abscessed Tooth is a Dental Emergency

An active dental infection is considered a dental emergency. These infections can spread quickly. Believe it or not, in 2018 we still have people dying from tooth infections because they put off seeing the dentist.

The reason for that is how quickly they can turn life-threatening. Think about how close his jaw is to both heart and brain. When an infection reaches those areas, things spiral downward rather quickly. Last year, a father of three young children passed away because he was planning on going to the dentist and was delayed. It spread suddenly and they couldn’t save him.

I’m saying this so your husband knows to take it seriously. If he happens to be one of many patients who have some dental anxiety and tend to avoid regular dental care, let him know there are dentists who cater to fearful patients giving them a pain-free appointment.

This blog is brought to you by Salem, MA Dentist Dr. Randall Burba.

Is a Gray Tooth a Dental Emergency?

I have a tooth that’s turning gray. I’ve tried whitening it but it didn’t help. I wondering if something serious is wrong. Is this like a dental emergency? What if I don’t have a regular dentist?

Carrie

Dear Carrie,

Woman giving thumbs up in a dental chair

A gray tooth is usually a sign that the tooth is dead or dying. Is there a chance that you’ve had some recent trauma to your mouth? That would explain the tooth. You do need to see a dentist soon. You’re going to need a root canal treatment and porcelain crown.

If you don’t have a regular dentist, that’s okay. There are emergency dentists. That’s not a specialty. It just means that they’re regular dentists that are willing to see non-established patients in the case of an emergency. This would be what you need. They’ll take x-rays and get a good look at the damage and go from there.

How Not to Need an Emergency Dentist

Trauma can’t always be avoided unless you’re someone who likes to hang out in front of a ball machine. That’s not recommended.

But, certain things, like tooth infections, can almost always be avoided. The key is regular check-ups. There are usually two reasons people avoid going to the dentist regularly. The first is financial. They don’t have dental insurance so they feel they can’t afford it. Most dentists are willing to let you pay out your treatment. You just need to talk to your dentist ahead of time.

The second is fear of the dentist. Most dental anxieties start in childhood. Some dentists enjoy helping patients with anxiety. Dr. Burba realized that with patients, their fear stemmed from the shot. That’s why he invested time learning how to give pain-free shots. In fact, most of his patients don’t even realize he’s administered the shot at all.

Planning Ahead with Dental Crowns

Like your gray tooth. porcelain crowns will not whiten, even with professional teeth whitening. That’s why it’s important to get them the color you’d like them to be when they’re placed. Your dentist can create them to any whiteness you desire. But, you’ll want your natural teeth to match, so make sure you whiten your teeth before the final color of your crown is decided.

This blog is brought to you by AACD accredited dentist Dr. Randall Burba.

Which One of Us Did the Emergency Dentist Give the Wrong Treatment?

Something doesn’t seem quite kosher in a recent experience my husband and I had with an emergency dentist. We both had similar symptoms on different days, but received vastly different treatment. I had a toothache that would flare up every now and again. It was tolerable and I was busy so I just went on with things, while keeping a gauge on it. Eventually, I had some time and went to an emergency dentist. I was surprised to hear I needed a root canal treatment and crown. I went ahead and got them because he was the dentist and I was in pain. A few weeks later, my husband mentions his tooth hurts. I warned him to go in right away so he wouldn’t end up needing a root canal treatment, but like me, he’s stubborn. He waited for several weeks until it blew up and the pain was more than he was willing to put up with. But, when he saw the same emergency dentist, he just got a filling. The way I see it, either I was cheated and given a treatment I didn’t really need or he wasn’t properly cared for. Which do you think I should be worried about?

Aleiya M.

Dear Aleiya,

A man in pain needs to see a Salem Emergency Dentist

What to Expect From Your Emergency Dentist

There are a couple of issues going on here. The first is that this emergency dentist didn’t explain why you needed those procedures to either you or your husband. It’s unfair for a dentist to allow you to get a procedure without first explaining why it’s necessary and takes the time to answer any questions you may have.

I haven’t examined either of you but can give you a general idea of why some patients need a root canal treatment and some don’t, even with the same symptoms. A root canal treatment can be done for a number of reasons. Some of those include having an infected tooth, a cracked tooth, or even a cavity where the decay has reached the pulp of your tooth or gotten too close to the nerves in your tooth. The crown can be necessary if the tooth has died or if a cavity is so large it would weaken the tooth too much to do a simple filling.

It’s possible you had a cavity which was so large it reached the pulp requiring a root canal treatment and a crown. Your husband’s decay may have spread much slower causing him to only need a simple filling. Again, I’m sorry your dentist didn’t explain to either of you why you needed the procedures.

How to Prevent Dental Emergencies

Another item that occurs to me is both of you needed to go to an emergency dentist. That often indicates you’re either new to the area and haven’t found a permanent dentist yet, or you have enough dental anxiety that you avoid getting regular dental care and only go in on an as-needed basis.

If you’re among the latter, let me assure you that there are dentists who cater to anxious patients. Working to put you at ease and give you a stress-free, pain-free dental appointment. I know getting regular care can be nerve-racking, but often just one or two appointments a year can not only prevent your cavities from spreading so far that the more intrusive procedures such as root canal treatment are not needed, but they can even prevent cavities altogether.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.

Dentist Humiliated Me about the Condition of My Teeth?

I’m beyond humiliated. I haven’t been to the dentist in years because of finances. Though, I do try hard to take care of my teeth. I brush twice a day and floss every night. Yet, when I went to the dentist there was a LOT wrong with my teeth. That was bad enough, but when I asked him how I could spread out the treatment because I couldn’t afford everything he suggested he started yelling at me and telling me how irresponsible I’ve been about my teeth. He said if I care that little about them why don’t I just have them all extracted and get dentures. Then I’d not have to do anything for them. Then he stormed out. The office has an open floor plan so everyone in the entire clinic heard him. I was absolutely horrified and left in tears, without even paying because I was too embarrassed to stop. What do I do? Are dentures my only option if I can’t afford to get the work done? I’m only 37. It sounds horrifying to wear dentures at my age.

MaryAnne E.

Dear MaryAnne,

You certainly don’t deserve to be treated the way that dentist treated you, even if you hadn’t been taking care of your teeth, which you’ve obviously tried to do. When you haven’t been to the dentist in a while, it’s normal for you to need a lot of work done. Your dentist should have been happy to list it out for you in staged treatment lists.

Result of dentures

Whatever you do, don’t remove all of your teeth and replace them with dentures, especially at your age. When all your teeth are removed, your body begins reabsorbing the minerals in your jawbone to use elsewhere throughout your body. It’s remarkably efficient the way our body works. The problem comes in about ten or twenty years. You’ll only be in your 40s and you’ll no longer have enough jawbone left to even support dentures. Not to mention your face will take on a squashed appearance making you look two decades older than you are, as you can see from the illustration above.

My suggestion would be to get a second opinion from another dentist; preferably one who’s known for their kind manner to their patients. You can often find that kindness from dentists who work with fearful patients. Many patients with dental anxiety avoid the dentist for years. When they finally come back they don’t want to be judged or lectured. Neither do you.

When you go, have the dentist list out everything that needs to be done in order of importance. It’s important you save as many teeth as possible. Those which can’t be saved, it would be better to replace them with dental implants instead of dentures. These help to retain your jawbone.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.

Do I Really Have to Remove ALL My Teeth?

I’m a complete wreck. I haven’t been to the dentist since I was a child. They terrify me. But, I had a horrible toothache so I had to do something. I called around to an emergency dentist and he offered to see me the first thing in the morning. When I got there, I explained my situation and which tooth was hurting me. He offered to check all of them, which I thought was very generous. Then he told me that not just the aching tooth needed to be pulled, but ALL my teeth needed to be pulled. I couldn’t believe it. He said I’d need to get a full set of dentures. I couldn’t believe my ears. He wanted to do it right then, but I refused, except for the tooth which is killing me. Please tell me there’s another solution. I’m still in my 20s. I can’t look like a grandmother yet.

Stacey A.

Dear Stacey,

In your place, I would get a second opinion. I know you don’t have a dentist, but I’m afraid this emergency dentist didn’t do his do diligence. Surely at least a few of your teeth could be saved or you’d be in much more pain than just that one tooth. You’d probably also have a few loose teeth due to gum disease.

Even if on the off-chance none of them can be saved, you’re not condemned to wear dentures. There are much better options in tooth replacement. If you don’t have gum disease, I’d suggest you get dental implants. They’re as close to having your own natural (but healthy) teeth back in your mouth as you can get. If you do have gum disease, get that dealt with and then get the implants. Not only will you not look like a grandmother, but if you go to an expert cosmetic dentist you can receive a stunningly gorgeous smile.

I wanted to take a moment to address your dental fear. There are gentle, kind dentists who work with fearful patients. They have techniques and procedures which can make your appointment very pleasant. Those with the strongest anxiety often find sedation a lovely solution. They can get their teeth worked on while they sleep.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.

Is This White Sore in My Mouth Cancer?

I’ve got this painful white sore in my mouth. It’s making it hard to eat. Do I have cancer? Should I see a dentist?

Missy P. – Kentucky

Missy,

I couldn’t tell you if it was oral cancer without examining it.  Before you panic, though, it could just as likely be a canker sore. Your dentist should be doing regular examinations for oral cancer. If you don’t have a dentist, you can see an emergency dentist if it turns out not to be a canker sore.

True canker sores usually clear up between 10-14 days. It will just be a matter of managing the pain until then. There are oral antiseptics you can purchase over the counter.  They won’t take care of all the pain, but they can take the edge off of it.

If it doesn’t clear up in that amount of time, it’s time to get it checked out.  As I said before, if you don’t have a regular dentist an emergency dentist will see you. I have seen that most people who avoid the dentist do so out of fear.  There are dentists who are compassionate with fearful patients, who have methods of giving you a pain-free dental appointment.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.

Left Without Help By An Emergency Dentist

It took a lot for me to go to the dentist even though it was an emergency. I knew I had a cavity on one tooth, but had been putting off getting it dealt with because dentists terrify me. The pain became so great I had to do something. I was especially worried because the pain seemed to have migrated onto the next tooth as well and I was worried it was spreading. I told them this and said I wanted to get all of it dealt with at one appointment because I don’t think I’d have the courage to go back again. They agreed. The dentist banged at the tooth that was bothering me. He took x-rays. He said there was a cavity that need to be filled. I reminded him about the other tooth. He acted surprised and looked at it again. Then said, “Oh yeah, there’s a problem there too.” Then he told me to schedule an appointment for follow up treatment and walked out the door. I was stunned. They had agreed to help me that day. I told the receptionist that as I checked out, but she said it’s the end of the day and there’s nothing more they can do. I practically had a panic attack getting there and not I’m left with nothing accomplished except what I knew before I got there. I’m still in a tremendous amount of pain and now out several hundred dollars. Is there any way to safely deal with this myself?  Please help me.

Natalie N. – Maryland

Natalie,

I’m am so sorry that this was your experience, especially after it took so much courage for you to go in. At the very least, the emergency dentist should have gotten you out of pain.  I want you to understand that not all dentists are this callous. I suspect he was rushing. You mentioned it was the end of the day. I’m a little disconcerted that he missed the original cavity. That hints that he was rushing.

Unfortunately, there is no home remedy that we’re aware of for dealing with cavities. They still have to be dug out and filled.

I’d like you to see another dentist in your area. Before you panic, I want to suggest something else. I want you to go to a sedation dentist or a cater to cowards dentist. They’re used to working with patients that have dental anxiety. They’ll also give you a pain-free experience.

To make sure you don’t repeat the experience you had, it will be helpful to also check their reviews. That way you’re more likely to  get a dentist with a positive chairside manner.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.