Tag Archives: dental implant failure

should I have to pay for a dental implant again after two years?

I had a dental implant placed a couple of years ago. It’s feeling loose and I’m kind of worried I’ll have to pay for another one. I heard these were supposed to last a long time. Will I have to pay all over again?

Tracy

Dear Tracy,

You’re right that it shouldn’t be loose after this short a period of time. However, there can be a lot of reasons for this to happen. Some of them are easy fixes. Before you give up, contact the dentist who placed your dental implant and let him know what is going on.

Why a Dental Implant Can Be Loose

Three parts of a dental implant
The three parts of a dental implant

Not every loose dental implant is a disastrous fix. Sometimes it is something simple. There are actually three parts of a dental implant which can struggle for one reason or another.

The Implant Crown

Sometimes it can just be the porcelain crown, which your dentist placed over the implant which has come loose. Repairing that is just a simple matter of re-bonding it on again. Many dentists will even fix this without charge.

The Abutment

This is a piece which fits between the implant and the crown. Maybe it has come loose . If it turns out the abutment was faulty, the dentist can contact the manufacturer and get a replacement at no cost to you.

The Implant Fixture

If it is the dental implant fixture which is loose, that can be more serious. Sometimes it is coming loose because of an infection. There is a chance that can be saved, but you need to get to your dentist right away. Even when a dental implant isn’t a factor an infection is considered a dental emergency.

If it is loose because it hasn’t integrated with the bone, there isn’t much that can be done. Even when everything is done perfectly, a dental implant procedure can fail. When done by an experienced, skilled cosmetic dentist it’s a rare occurrence, but they can still fail through no fault of either you or the dentist.

This blog is brought to you by Salem Dentist Dr. Ruandall Burba

Blade Implant Not Healing?

I don’t know what’s going on. I had a blade implant placed over 12 months ago and it still isn’t healed. Is something wrong or is this normal? Do I just wait it out?

Catherine

Dear Catherine,

Illustration of a dental implant

I’m curious as to why your dentist decided on a blade implant. While they have been in use for many years, there are better options in current practice. It’s generally used for people who don’t have a thick enough jawbone to retain a traditional screw implant but don’t want to do bone grafting.

Unfortunately, while traditional dental implants (pictured above) have a 98% success rate, blade implants only have around a 50% success rate. This should have healed within twelve months. At this point, something is wrong. You need to return to your implant surgeon and have them look and advice you.

Dental Implant Options

A woman's profile twice, one with facial collapse, one after
Wearing Dentures Leads to Facial Collapse

Bone loss in your jaw is usually the result of having missing teeth with no replaced root. For instance, if you removed your teeth but didn’t replace them or replaced them with removable dentures, the minerals in your bone start to resorb into your body. The result not only ages your appearance years, but it will also make you a denture cripple, forced onto a liquid diet the remainder of your days. This is known as facial collapse.

If you want to replace those teeth with an option which provides a prosthetic root, thereby preventing facial collapse, you need to have enough jaw bone. If you don’t, you have two great alternatives to blade implants.

Bone Grafting

This is a simple outpatient procedure which adds bone structure back into your jaw. The biggest benefit to this is it allows you to get screw implants which have a significantly higher success rate to the blade option.

All-on-4 Dental Implants

This doesn’t require grafting. Instead, the all-on-4 implant procedure places the implants at an angle helping them retain with less bone structure.

Cosmetic Considerations with Dental Implants

While it is wonderful to have a full mouth of teeth. If they’re not attractive teeth, you might not smile nearly as much as you would if you were provided with a stunning smile. Whether you are getting all new “teeth” or just a couple of implants, you’ll want a dentist who can make them match your teeth. You don’t want natural teeth next to obviously fake teeth.

One or Two Implants

I recommend before your implant crowns are made, you whiten the rest of your teeth. It’s an inexpensive way to drastically improve the aesthetics of your smile. But, the real reason for doing it before getting your crowns is the permanence of your crown color. Even professional teeth whitening only works on natural tooth structure. That means if you get the crowns first and then decide to whiten your teeth, your natural teeth will whiten. Your tooth replacements will not. Doing the whitening first means your implant crowns can be made to match the beautiful new color of your teeth.

A New Smile with Implant Overdentures

If you are getting a new smile with your implants, you want an expert cosmetic dentist to do the work. You are talking about a complete smile makeover made from dental crowns. Finding an expert cosmetic dentist is a lot easier than it used to be. The American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry has an accreditation program which helps patients to know who can give them a stunning smile.

Just go to aacd.com and click on find a dentist. Just make sure you put a check by “accredited dentist”. This way you get a list of those who are experts in their field.

This blog is brought to you by Salem, MA Dentist Dr. Randall Burba.

Can a Diabetic Get All-on-4 Dental Implants

After my husband died I really struggled. I stopped taking care of myself. I gained 100 pounds, developed diabetes, and even developed gum disease which led to losing several teeth. I didn’t care. Then, one day I was at a park and smiled at a little girl and she asked if I was homeless. I realized then, things had to change. I have a full life ahead of me. I started eating right. I joined a gym. I’ve almost completely lost all the weight I gained and I no longer have gum disease. I asked my dentist about what he recommended for my missing teeth and he suggested all-on-4 dental implants. I was super thrilled about the idea of having a full mouth of teeth again. But, I went home to do some research and learned that diabetics shouldn’t get them. I don’t want to pay all that money if it’s not going to work. What should I do? I really want teeth again.

Carra

Dear Carra,

illustration of a dental implant

First, let me add my condolences. Don’t be too hard on yourself regarding how you dealt with your grief in the beginning. It’s almost suffocating to lose a loved one and we all seem to lose ourselves at first too. You should be really thrilled with the incredible progress you’ve made since then. I think the healthy changes you’ve made are remarkable.

For the most part, dental implants have a 98% success rate when done by an experienced implant dentist. There are some factors which make patients more at risk for implant failure. The biggest of these are:

  • Gum Disease
  • Smoking
  • Uncontrolled Diabetes

You’ve already taken care of your gum disease, which is huge. A responsible dentist will NEVER give a patient who has gum disease dental implants. There’s no way for your body to retain them well, just like when you suffered from gum disease, they couldn’t retain your natural teeth. They will fail. Because you’ve already turned that around it’s not a worry for you.

You didn’t mention anything about smoking, which I hope means you’re not a smoker. Smoking lowers your blood flow in your gums which increases your risk of infection, a leading cause of dental implant failure. You also increase your risk of redeveloping gum disease.

Your diabetes is under control, so again, Yay! not a problem for you. I think you’re likely a good candidate for dental implants.

Are All-on-4 Dental Implants the Right Choice for You?

The only real reason to do the All-on-4 procedure rather than traditional implants is bone loss. Sometimes, with gum disease and tooth loss, you lose so much jawbone structure you don’t have enough to retain dental implants. All-on-4 is one way to get around that. However, there is a better, more reliable option.

If you don’t have enough bone to support traditional dental implants, I’d consider getting bone grafting done. It will build back up your bone structure. Then you’re free to get whatever procedure you want. I hope this helps you make your decision.

Best of luck and congratulations on all your hard work!
This blog is brought to you by AACD Accredited dentist Dr. Randall Burba.

Why Do My Dental Implant Keep Snapping Off?

Can you help me? I’m feeling desperate at this point?  I needed to replace a tooth I’d lost many years ago. My dentist insisted I get bone grafting done first, which I did. That had to heal. Then I had the implant surgery.  That required more healing.  Finally, a year later, I received the implant crown. Just a month later, it snapped off. My dentist offered to re-do everything. So, I go through it all again. The end of year two approaches. Then again, just a few weeks later the implant breaks.  He says he’ll re-do it one more time, but that is it. He thinks I’m doing something reckless with the implants, but I’ve racked my brain and cannot come up with what I’m doing wrong. Can you help me?

Katrina V. – Pennsylvania

Katrina,

The problem isn’t you. It’s your dentist. Tell him you just want a refund and get this done somewhere else. Dental implants shouldn’t break off like that.  When there is dental implant failure of this type,  it is usually for one of two reasons.

  1. Your dentist is cutting corners by purchasing implant materials overseas. A well-made implant will cost at least $200 here. If they’re purchased overseas they’re only a few dollars. The big problem with that, is they’re so cheap because they’re made cheaply.

When the first one broke it should have given your dentist pause to think about why.

2. A second reason for an implant to break is the dentist isn’t placing them properly. It’s not just a matter of lining up the implant to handle direct force. Our teeth move in a grinding motion, too, when we chew our food. If the implant isn’t carefully placed, just chewing will weaken and eventually snap.

I don’t like the fact that your dentist is trying to blame you for his incompetence. Either he was too incompetent to place them properly or he was too incompetent to recognize the implants he purchased were cheaply made and not holding up.

When you do go to another dentist to have these done, make sure it’s a dentist with enough training to be considered a dental implant specialist.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.

Worried I’m Losing My Dental Implants

I struggle with gum disease. It’s been affecting my teeth and now I’m worried it’s affecting my dental implants. A few months ago I had dental implants placed after losing two teeth. My dentist tried to save them. He knew gum disease was in issue. In fact, we even doubled my dental appointments, getting me cleanings every three months. Unfortunately, despite his best efforts the teeth were lost. He said it was important I replace the teeth or the remaining ones will shift. His recommendation was dental implants. I LOVE them, but now am worried. They’re feeling a little loose. Am I at risk of losing those too?  Please tell me it’s not too late to save them?

Abigail W. – New Hampshire

Abigail,

I’m concerned about some of the things you’ve written. First, let’s talk about your gum disease. Simply increasing your cleanings and check-ups, while a good start is not enough.  They should have been doing specific treatments for your gums.

If you have gum disease he should have never given you dental implants. Gum disease is contraindicative for implants. Without intervention quickly, you’re going to lose your implants. If you think about it, it’s only logical. If your gums weren’t healthy enough to retain your teeth, they’re not going to be able to retain your gums either.

My recommendation for you is to see a different dentist who treats dental implants.  This one has obviously not given you the proper care.

If you get in quickly, there’s a chance you can save your implants.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.

Now That My Implants Are Secure, Can I Smoke?

I had implants placed over eight months ago. My dentist insisted I quit smoking before he’d do them, which I did. The healing time is all over and I’ve been doing just fine. I know it’s been a while, but I am still craving cigarettes. Is okay to start smoking now that everything’s stable?

Jason B. – Idaho

Jason,

You’ve done so well without smoking, I’d hate for you to go back now.  You might be thinking just one, but before you know it,  you’ll be back to a pack a day.

I know it seems like you’re in the clear now that the healing time is over, but patients who smoke are at a much higher risk of dental implant failure than other patients.

Smoking reduces the blood flow in your gums, which increases the chance for gum disease and infection. That will cause your implants to fail.

I know it’s hard, but you’ve made so much progress. Don’t give up now!

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.