Tag Archives: dentures versus dental implants

Are Dentures as Attractive as Dental Implants?

I’m 39 years old and need to get dentures. My dentist really wants me to get dental implants because they are better, but dentures are much more affordable. Can dentures be made as attractive as dental implants or do I have to get implants for a pretty smile?

misty

Dear Misty,

An illustration of both a denture and a dental implant

It is a shame you are having to lose your teeth at such as young age. Have you had a second opinion to see how many of your teeth can be saved?

While dentures can be made as beautiful and natural looking as dental implants, it is not their appearance which makes dental implants the better option. In fact, at your age, it is even more important. Let me explain.

Dental Implants Prevent Facial Collapse

When your teeth are removed, your body recognizes this. Without having teeth roots in your jawbone it feels the minerals there are of better use elsewhere. Trying to be efficient, it resorbs those minerals to use elsewhere. While useful to the parts getting the minerals, it has the unfortunate effect of shrinking your jawbone. Eventually, you won’t have enough jawbone left to even keep your dentures in. This is known as facial collapse.

With dental implants, a prosthetic root is surgically placed into your jawbone. This signals to your body that the bone is still necessary and preserves its structure.

If You Can’t Afford Dental Implants

When talking about a full set of dentures it is too expensive to do a one-to-one ratio of teeth to implants. Because of that, most patients will get implant overdentures. This uses between four and six implants and then fixes your dentures to them. This simultaneously protects your jawbone while saving you some money.

For some patients, even this is out of reach. In that case, my suggestion is to get snap-on dentures. This can use as few as two dental implants. It will keep the dentures from falling out and preserve at least some of your bone.

This blog is brought to you by Salem, MA Dentist Dr. Randall Burba.

What If Dentures are my Only Option?

I’m in a pickle. I’ve had four pregnancies in six years which kept me vomiting every day, multiple times a day. Then, when I was done with that, I was diagnosed with cancer. My teeth are an absolute wreck as a result. Many of them are literally crumbling. I think the only thing I can afford is dentures. I’m about to completely lose it. I keep hearing dentists say dentures are the worst thing I can do but I’m not sure I have a choice. I’ve no money left and am still paying off tens of thousands of dollars for my treatments.

Emily

Dear Emily,

An illustration of both a denture and a dental implant

You have been through a lot and I don’t want you to beat yourself up. Sometimes, our health (even the health of our teeth) are beyond our control. In your case, I’m going to make a couple of suggestions to see if we can help you get the health you need for your jaw as well as a beautiful smile.

You mentioned dentists have warned you against dentures. The reason for that is the danger of facial collapse. Your jawbone slowly shrinks. Eventually, there is not enough money to even keep your dentures in place. The upper dentures are held in by suction, so those are a bit safer. The bottom ones just sit on the ridge of your jawbone.

If at all possible, I am going to suggest you get snap-on dentures on your bottom arch. This can place as few as two dental implants into your jawbone and keep your dentures from falling out. Plus, it will preserve the bone where ever you have an implant. From there, you can save up for other implants as you are able.

Getting Beautiful Dentures

Regardless of the type of your tooth replacement option, you want to make certain, the dentist who prepares them will create a beautiful smile for you. This is one of the few upsides for your particular situation. After years of damage to your teeth, you can now have the smile of your dreams.

Not all cosmetic dentists are equal in skill. It’s not a recognized specialty by the American Dental Association, so it is up to the dentist how much time and training he or she invests in learning how to make beautiful smile makeovers. There are two sources where you can find dentists capable of giving you a gorgeous smile.

The first is the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry website. They have a link where you can find a cosmetic dentist. When you list your area, make sure you check that you’re looking for an accredited dentist. These are the ones with expertise and artistry. The second source is mynewsmile.com. They also have a “Find a Cosmetic Dentist” link. Not all of them are accredited. However, each one of them has been screened for their technical and artistic skill.

This blog is brought to you by Salem, MA Dentist Dr. Randall Burba.

Will I Have to Have Surgery for Dentures?

I’m trying to figure out whether or not to get dentures or dental implants. I hate the idea of surgery so was leaning toward dentures. But, wonder if they require surgery too.

Jack B.

Dear Jack,

An illustration of both a denture and a dental implant

I think when it comes to deciding between two procedures, I’d first look at the long-term effects. Once you know how they’ll affect your quality of life, then you can weigh that against placement procedures.

Dentures Versus Dental Implants

Dentures are a removable tooth replacement option. The top arch stays in by suction. The bottom arch sits on the ridge of your jawbone. They have several “downsides” but I’ll just give the biggest. Once your teeth are removed, your body will reabsorb the minerals once used by your jawbone to help you keep the roots of your teeth in place. Without those minerals, your jawbone will begin to shrink. After a while, you’ll lose so much bone that you won’t have enough to keep in your dentures. This is known as facial collapse because of the way it makes your face look shrunken and prune-like.

Dental Implants are permanent. Prosthetic root forms, either titanium or zirconia, will be surgically implanted into your jawbone. After a period of healing you’ll have dental crowns placed on top. Aside from the obvious benefits of being just like having your natural, healthy teeth back, implants preserve your jawbone. No matter how many years you have them, they’ll protect you from facial collapse.

Surgery for Dentures

While dentures don’t require the same surgery as dental implants, you are talking about a major extraction. You have to extract all your teeth. This, like dental implants, also requires a healing period of 8 weeks or so.

There are two types of dentures you can get that affect the surgery.

Immediate dentures These are placed right after the teeth are extracted, having two benefits. First, you can walk out the office with your new smile intact. Second, it helps reduce the swelling and bleeding that occurs after having a major teeth extraction. The downside is they’re usually more expensive than conventional dentures because they take more time to make. You’re also required to have more follow-up visits, which are necessary to make adjustments.

Conventional Dentures These require you wait for about eight weeks after the extraction procedure for placement. However, they do tend to fit better than immediate dentures. During the healing process, your tissue will shrink and the immediate dentures will become loose. To aid with that, a soft temporary reline material is placed on the denture for refitting. It takes about six months for your month to completely heal after the extractions and at this time a more permanent reline or new denture is needed.

As you can see, either procedure requires extensive work. So, as I mentioned earlier, ask yourself which one has the best quality of life experience after they’re placed. The answer to that is definitely dental implants.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.

Am I Doomed to Dentures?

My dentist said that my teeth aren’t worth saving and I should just get dental implants. When he showed me the price tag, I almost had a stroke. I told him there was no way I could afford to get those. He just shrugged and told me it’s that or dentures. I want to cry. Am I really doomed to dentures at 31?

Rebecca L.

Dear Rebecca,

Salem Snap on Denture

I’m a tad concerned that your dentist said that your teeth weren’t worth saving. Most dentists are of the opinion that every tooth is worth saving. You’ll find that saving natural teeth gives you a much better quality of life.

Sometimes teeth can’t be saved, even when you try your best. When that happens, then yes, dental implants are your best option. They’re the closest thing to having your own natural teeth. As you discovered, they are pretty pricey.

While dentures are a more affordable option, many patients hate them because they’re not anchored. At your age, dentures would be disastrous. There’s a condition known as facial collapse that will become an inevitability for you. When your teeth are removed, your body recognizes there is no longer a need for your jawbone to support the roots of your teeth. To that end, it removes the minerals in your jawbone to use elsewhere in your body where they may be more beneficial. Unfortunately, that means losing jawbone structure. Before long, you won’t have enough jawbone left to retain your dentures.

You may be feeling doomed right now, but there are options. The first one is the most important. I want you to get a second opinion. I can’t imagine, unless you just haven’t taken care of your teeth AT ALL, that at least some of your teeth cannot be saved. The more teeth you save, the better your outcome and the less money you’ll have to spend on replacements. It might be you won’t have to even worry about whether to get dental implants or dentures.

But, let’s plan for the worst. If you get a second opinion and the dentist said there wasn’t a way to save your teeth, don’t despair. It may be possible for you to set up a payment plan with your dentist in order to afford dental implants. Then you wouldn’t have to worry about being doomed to dentures. But, there’s always a possibility that even with the most generous payment plan, it would still be impossible for you.

If that’s the case, a decent option would be to get snap-on dentures. They use as few as two implants which enables you to snap the dentures. While you’re still getting dentures, these have a couple of benefits. First, they’re anchored. You won’t have to worry about them falling out the way traditional dentures do. Second, the areas that have the snaps will not lose jawbone.

You can do snap-on dentures with as few as two, but this allows you to save up until you can get a decent set of dental implants.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.

My Dentist Has Me Terrified I’m Going to Be Humiliated

I’m caught between a rock and a hard place. I want dental implants, but can’t afford them. I’m stuck with dentures. But, my dentist keeps telling me these horror stories about people’s dentures falling out in public situations. I’m terrified I’m going to be humiliated. Is this a given? Am I eventually going to be on one of the “funniest videos” shows?

Amanda L.  – Missouri

Amanda,

I think it is unfair for your dentist to try to scare you into a procedure. He’s supposed to tell you the pros and cons of each procedure, but not this way.  This is histrionics.

The real downside to dentures as opposed to dental implants is the loss of jawbone. When your teeth are removed, your body begins reabsorbing the minerals in your jawbone to use elsewhere. Eventually, that causes your jawbone to shrink and your dentures to slip.

Let me say, that takes several years to happen, so you have a couple of options. First, you can get snap-on dentures. While they’re not as ideal as implants, they’re a great option for people in your position. They anchor the dentures to your gums. You can get them as few as two implants. You can get more, of course, but two are the most affordable.

That also helps with your second option. Get dentures (or snap-on dentures) while saving up for implants. You can gradually add more implants as you’re able.

This blog is brought to you by  Dr. Randall Burba.

 

I can’t chew very well with my dentures

I’m hoping you can give me some denture advice. Ever since I’ve got them, it’s been very hard to chew. Is there anything I can do? My dentist says the dentures are fitting properly.

Scott D. – Georgia

Scott,

Even the best fitting dentures will reduce your chewing efficiency by 50%.  That can be discouraging. Ideally, when you need to replace teeth, you’d get dental implants. However, that is not in the budget for all patients and they’re stuck with dentures.

If you’re in that category, you might consider getting snap-on dentures. That will anchor them and help with your chewing efficiency.

You still won’t feel like you did with natural teeth or you would with dental implants, but it will be a significant improvement.

There will be the added benefit of allowing you to retain some of your jawbone. Obviously , the more implants, the better the stability and the more bone will be retained, but as long as you have a minimum of two, you should see some improvement.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba