Tag Archives: problems with porcelain veneers

Problem Speaking After Porcelain Veneers

I had ten porcelain veneers put on ten teeth. Ever since then, I have had trouble speaking. I’m not sure what to do. It feels like the backs of my teeth are too thick and my tongue is pushed. It’s making me talk weird. My dentist has no idea what is wrong. Have you heard of this?

Brooke

Dear Brooke,

A single porcelain veneer being held up by a dental instrument

Looking at the image of porcelain veneers above, you can see that it doesn’t have any part of it that goes on the back of your teeth. It won’t affect your speech there. However, there are some dentists who place porcelain crowns and tell their patients it is porcelain veneers. If they surround your teeth, they’re crowns. If they just go on the front of your teeth, they’re porcelain veneers. Sometimes the length of porcelain veneers can affect your speech, but you said it was bothering you from the back. That’s not the same.

If it turns out he place crowns, then he’s not only been dishonest, he’s also thrown off your bite. If that’s what happened, you can get him to pay for these to be re-done by a dentist who has both cosmetic dentistry training (preferably someone who is an AACD accredited dentist) as well has having done post-doctoral TMJ training. That’s the kind of dentist who will know how to repair the bite’s position as well as give you a beautiful smile.

Another possibility is your dentist did place porcelain veneers and the thick feeling in your tongue is completely unrelated. You could have had an allergic reaction to something and that is why you’re having trouble speaking.

How Can You Get Help

The first thing I would do is get a second opinion. I again suggest going to a skilled cosmetic dentist. There is a trick to this, though. Dentists know each other. They are one another’s peer group. So one dentist might hesitate to say something unkind about work their friend did.

This is why you won’t tell them who did the work. First, ask him if you received porcelain veneers or dental crowns. Then, ask him if he knows why you’re having trouble speaking. If he asks for the name of the dentist tell him, you want a blind, unbiased second opinion so you won’t be sharing any names.

This blog is brought to you by Salem, MA Cosmetic Dentist Dr. Randall Burba.

Why Is My Veneer Turning Dark at the Top?

I received two porcelain veneers on my front teeth a couple of years ago. I only needed one but ended up getting two. The dentist said that was necessary to make sure my two front teeth match. It worked out, they matched and looked very nice. I’m concerned because one of them has developed a dark line at the very top. Will this happen to both of them? Is there any way to fix it? It’s a little embarrassing.

Stephanie H.

Dear Stephanie,

Porcelain veneers shouldn’t ever develop a line at the top. There are two possible scenarios, but both mean your dentist didn’t do the job correctly. That actually wouldn’t surprise me because he told you he needed to do two veneers in order to get them to match. If he were a skilled cosmetic dentist that wouldn’t be true. He could match a single veneer to the rest of your teeth.

First, the veneers should have been made flush with your natural tooth. If your dentist didn’t do that, it would leave a ledge which can gather all kinds of food and bacteria. That would be a possible explanation of the dark line. It will also lead to decay so he should repair this free of charge.

A second possibility is the dentist didn’t bond the veneer properly. This allows things to slip in between. This would more likely make the entire veneer look darker. Unfortunately, it also will lead to decay and should be repaired free of charge.

I’d get a second opinion from an expert cosmetic dentist, just to get an objective opinion as to what is going on. Don’t be surprised if he tells you what you actually have are two porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns and not porcelain veneers. Those DO develop a dark line at the gumline as a matter of course, but generally it takes more than two years for that to pop it’s ugly head out. If this is the case it’s just another piece of evidence that your dentist isn’t qualified in cosmetics. Front teeth require all-porcelain crowns. The metal based ones are better for back teeth.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.

My veneers are broken & making me lisp

I had four porcelain veneers put on my front teeth.  In the first week they all cracked and fell off.  My dentist tried several times to bond them back on, but with no success. I went to another dentist he recommended. He made new veneers for me, but these are longer than the others were and now I have a lisp when I talk. I’m not sure I like how they look. Do you know what is going on? I’ve spent over six grand on these and now I’m wondering if I should just have left my teeth the way they were.

Carlee O.- Jacksonville, FL

Carlee,

The problem is the dentists you’ve chosen. An expert cosmetic dentist would never have had the problems you’ve experienced. I don’t know how you decided on your original dentist. Maybe he was just your family dentist and he told you he was able to handle the procedure. Though he may have learned how to place porcelain veneers, that does not make him a skilled cosmetic dentist. The bonding techniques alone take tremendous skill. You’ve seen the results of not doing those right. Even if a veneer cracks, if it is bonded on correctly it will not fall off.

With the second dentist, obviously you just went with who your dentist recommended, but he obviously doesn’t know what he’s doing either.  The lisp comes from the length. When they are too long, it can cause a lisp. So, not only do they look funny, but they have caused a speech impediment.

My recommendation is for you to bite the bullet and have them re-done by an expert cosmetic dentist. One who is not only skilled with the technical aspects that will prevent problems with bonding and speech, but is also an artist. With an artistic cosmetic dentist, you can have the smile of your dreams.

It’s probably advisable to have more than four teeth done. However, if that is all you want I recommend you do teeth whitening on the remainder of your teeth so they will match in color with your veneers.

This blog is brought to you by Boston Cosmetic Dentist Dr. Randall Burba.