Tag Archives: Supersmile toothpaste

Porcelain Veneers & Mouthwash

I have porcelain veneers that I love. I’m mixing up a homemade mouthwash to help care for them, but wanted to run the ingredients by you first:

8 oz. Boiled water (I also filter my water)
8 oz. Hydrogen Peroxide
1 T. Sea Salt

Do you see anything harmful about this?

Carmella

Dear Carmella,

porcelain veneer being placed on a tooth

I am glad that you love your porcelain veneers and want to take good care of them. While nothing in the DIY mouthwash you listed will harm the porcelain veneers directly, there will be a separate issue.

Hydrogen peroxide releases oxygen. This will kill bad bacteria that leads to gum disease, but it will also kill good bacteria that helps your mouth. If you use this regularly, it will lead to candida growth and an oral yeast infection. Using a peroxide rinse every once in a while is fine, though.

In most cases, you don’t need a mouthwash to take care of your porcelain veneers. Regular brushing and flossing should do it. If you want a special toothpaste to help keep them white, then I would recommend Supersmile Toothpaste. This is specially designed for cosmetic dental work.

Some patients, however, really feel they need a mouthwash. If you are in that category, the most important thing is making sure that there is NO alcohol in the ingredients.

If there is, the alcohol will soften the bonding and cause ditching and staining around the edges. Using an alcohol-free mouthwash will prevent that.

This blog is brought to you by Boston Cosmetic Dentist Dr. Randall Burba, an AACD Accredited Dentist.

My Dental Bonding Turned Yellow

I had dental bonding placed on four front teeth. I was happy with finally having front teeth which didn’t looked so damaged and chipped. I tend to grind my teeth so that was a problem. I wanted to take care of them and started brushing with baking soda. I’ve only had them for less than a week and they’re already turning yellow. Did the baking soda have a chemical reaction with the bonding? Will teeth whitening fix them?

Kelly

Dear Kelly,

before and after dental bonding

There are a couple of things going on here which are setting off warning bells in my head. First, is the care of your dental bonding. I’m concerned that your dentist didn’t seem to give you any post-operative care instructions for your bonded teeth. This could have prevented this issue.

While you had good intentions in trying to take good care of your bonded teeth, you weren’t instructed on how to do that. Unfortunately, baking soda is quite abrasive and will eventually wear off the protective polish on your bonded teeth. If you really want to take good care of them, I am going to suggest you switch to Supersmile Toothpaste after this is fixed. This is specifically designed to clean and protect cosmetic dental work. It’s perfect for natural teeth as well.

As for teeth whitening, it will not work on your dental bonding. It only works on natural tooth structure, which means your natural teeth will get whiter, but the bonded teeth will be unaffected. This will make them look worse, not better.

Because you’ve had them for such a short period of time and your dentist didn’t instruct you in their care, I suggest going back to your dentist and asking him to fix them at no charge. If he knows the polishing technique, he can do it that way. Otherwise, he’ll need to just re-do them.

A second possibility is that your dentist used inferior materials when he placed your bonding. I hope that is not true. The only way to know with certainty is after you have them fixed. If you are caring for them properly and they turn yellow again, it is his material.

I’m also providing a link here, which gives you a lot of information on dental bonding. If you scroll toward the bottom, it will tell you how to care for them.

Bruxism and Dental Bonding

Another thing which has me concerned is your teeth grinding. When you clench or grind your teeth it will lead to damage. You’ve experienced this yourself and it is why you had the bonding done in the first place. However, without addressing the cause of the damage, the bonding won’t hold up any better than your natural teeth did.

It doesn’t sound like your dentist has addressed this. There is a simple solution too. Have him fit you for a nightguard and your dental bonding, as well as the remainder of your teeth, will be protected. Without it, they’ll end up ground down to nubs and you’ll eventually need a full-mouth reconstruction.

This blog is brought to you by Salem, MA Dentist Dr. Randall Burba.

Porcelain Veneer Cracked

I had a set of 10 porcelain veneers done to lengthen my teeth. They are stunning and I’m in love with my smile. I’m not wealthy, but recently received an inheritance which allowed me to get the smile of my dreams. I went to the best cosmetic dentist around. I’m truly thrilled with the results. Here’s my problem. I can’t afford this office regularly. After I had my veneers done I planned on going back to my normal dentist for things like check-ups. I’ve only had the veneers for about 5 months and one of them has cracked. I’m a little embarrassed about going back and worried I won’t be able to afford it. The crack is horizontal about a fifth of the way up my lateral incisor. I’m worried it will fall off. What do you recommend?

Lizzie

Dear Lizzie,

A single porcelain veneer being placed

Normally, a well-bonded porcelain veneer will stay on even if it has a crack. However, because of the location of your crack and the fact your dentist had to add length to your teeth, I’m worried there’s not much bonding in that location to hold it on. Because of that, this needs to be repaired.

While porcelain veneers aren’t guaranteed to last forever, they’re certainly meant to last for more than the amount of time you’ve had them. In fact, when well taken care of, they can last for upwards of 20 years. I think your dentist will likely repair it at no charge or for a very low fee. I wouldn’t let fear of the cost stop you.

You were smart to invest wisely in an expert cosmetic dentist for your work. Don’t feel guilty about not being able to go there for your regular checkups. The best cosmetic dentists realize some patients come to them just for their cosmetic work and have all their general dental work done elsewhere at a more affordable practice.

If they ask you about scheduling your six-month checkup while you’re there, just be politely upfront with them about your financial situation. They shouldn’t be offended.

A Note on Porcelain Veneer Care

The best toothpaste for your porcelain veneers would be Supersmile. This is specially formulated for cosmetic work to keep it stain-free without damaging the glazing.

Because you’re going to your general dental clinic for your checkups, the hygienist might not be familiar with taking care of cosmetic work. Two things to tell her (or him) to avoid are a power prohy jet (or anything similar) and acidulated fluoride. Both of those will take off the glazing from your porcelain veneers. The glazing is what makes them so stain resistant. If that comes off, they’ll quickly start picking up stains and be ruined. Teeth whitening won’t fix them. They’d have to be replaced.

This blog is brought to you by Salem, MA Dentist Dr. Randall Burba.

Porcelain Veneers Staining After Months

I am thinking I did something terrible. My dentist told me that my porcelain veneers would last for years. But, I’ve only had them for a little over seven months and they look awful. They were fine, even at my six-month checkup and cleaning. It was after that they started picking up stains. I don’t know what I did. I thought I was super careful. I researched and got a special toothpaste that’s supposed to be for porcelain veneers called Supersmile. Was that a scam? Did that mess them up? Can this be fixed? I’m embarrassed to tell my dentist, but I really love these veneers.

Cathy

Dear Cathy,

A single porcelain veneer being held up by a dental instrument

You didn’t do anything wrong. The Supersmile toothpaste isn’t a scam. It’s actually the absolute best toothpaste you could have purchased for your porcelain veneers. Great job looking that up. It’s something your dentist should have told you about when you first got the veneers placed.

My suspicion is it’s your dentist’s office that made the terrible mistake. It sounds to me, based on the timeline you’ve given that your hygienist didn’t understand the proper care of porcelain veneers and used something on it like a prophy jet during your cleaning.

This would have removed the glaze from your veneers, leaving them dull and susceptible to staining. Without the glaze, they’ll never look good again.

What Do You Do If Your Glaze Is Removed on Your Porcelain Veneers?

Because it’s your dentist’s office that likely did this they need to fix it. There is a special procedure which requires a special diamond polishing technique which could restore the glaze. Unfortunately, it’s such an advanced procedure I doubt your cosmetic dentist knows it, especially if they didn’t even know how to properly clean your veneers.

My guess is they’re going to have to replace your veneers completely. If they give you any problem with that, you can show them this post. Or, maybe go to another cosmetic dentist for a second opinion. Sometimes, not wanting to look bad in front of your local peers is a great motivator.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.

My Porcelain Veneers Are Stained

I’m thrilled with the way porcelain veneers have improved my smile. I have a new found confidence. People even stop me on the streets and in stores to tell me they love my smile. I get happy all over just thinking about it. I’m a little confused though. My dentist told me they’d last at least ten years, but more likely even more than that. It’s only been seven months and they’ve already started picking up stains. I thought they were supposed to be stain resistant.

Elena K. – Manhattan

Elena,

The information you were given is correct. Porcelain veneers are very stain resistant. Even more so than your natural teeth. And, yes, that should last many years.  The fact that your veneers are picking up stains so quickly tells me they’ve been damaged in some way.

If you’re only seeing stains in areas like little scratches, that might lead me to believe it’s the toothpaste you’re using. Whitening toothpastes are very abrasive and can put micro-scratches on porcelain, which would allow it to pick up stains. Your dentist should have warned you and told you the best way to care for them.

A great toothpaste to use when you have cosmetic work done is Supersmile. It’s specifically formulated for the porcelain you find in veneers and crowns.

If the stains are all over then it’s possible, during your six-month cleaning, the hygienist used something like a prophy jet or another type of power polishing equipment. Though many hygienists are trained to deal with cleaning porcelain veneers, this one maybe hasn’t been, or she could have just forgotten you had veneers placed. This will take the glaze completely off. You’ll notice the staining is all over and not just in micro scratches.

If that’s the case, your dentist should be willing to replace them, as they caused the damage.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.