Tag Archives: tooth trauma

Is a Gray Tooth a Dental Emergency?

I have a tooth that’s turning gray. I’ve tried whitening it but it didn’t help. I wondering if something serious is wrong. Is this like a dental emergency? What if I don’t have a regular dentist?

Carrie

Dear Carrie,

Woman giving thumbs up in a dental chair

A gray tooth is usually a sign that the tooth is dead or dying. Is there a chance that you’ve had some recent trauma to your mouth? That would explain the tooth. You do need to see a dentist soon. You’re going to need a root canal treatment and porcelain crown.

If you don’t have a regular dentist, that’s okay. There are emergency dentists. That’s not a specialty. It just means that they’re regular dentists that are willing to see non-established patients in the case of an emergency. This would be what you need. They’ll take x-rays and get a good look at the damage and go from there.

How Not to Need an Emergency Dentist

Trauma can’t always be avoided unless you’re someone who likes to hang out in front of a ball machine. That’s not recommended.

But, certain things, like tooth infections, can almost always be avoided. The key is regular check-ups. There are usually two reasons people avoid going to the dentist regularly. The first is financial. They don’t have dental insurance so they feel they can’t afford it. Most dentists are willing to let you pay out your treatment. You just need to talk to your dentist ahead of time.

The second is fear of the dentist. Most dental anxieties start in childhood. Some dentists enjoy helping patients with anxiety. Dr. Burba realized that with patients, their fear stemmed from the shot. That’s why he invested time learning how to give pain-free shots. In fact, most of his patients don’t even realize he’s administered the shot at all.

Planning Ahead with Dental Crowns

Like your gray tooth. porcelain crowns will not whiten, even with professional teeth whitening. That’s why it’s important to get them the color you’d like them to be when they’re placed. Your dentist can create them to any whiteness you desire. But, you’ll want your natural teeth to match, so make sure you whiten your teeth before the final color of your crown is decided.

This blog is brought to you by AACD accredited dentist Dr. Randall Burba.

Can Children Get Porcelain Veneers?

My son is almost nine and he fell and chipped his front tooth. It’s a permanent tooth so I want to repair it in a way that will both last and look natural. I had porcelain veneers done several years ago because of stained and chipped teeth and love them. Can children have veneers done? I think he’d only need one.

Carla T.

Dear Carla,

A chipped tooth
Can Porcelain Veneers Fixed Chipped Teeth?

It’s fantastic that you’re looking out for your son’s smile. I especially like that you’re thinking through a permanent solution for him. While porcelain veneers can repair chipped teeth, I don’t recommend them in children.

Their jaws are in almost constant development throughout their childhood. That keeps the way their bite relates to its surroundings in flux as well, making it nearly impossible to keep on without changing it often. While technically do-able, it’s an expensive way to repair his chipped tooth, especially when there are better options.

Repairing a Chipped Tooth Without Porcelain Veneers

There are three basic options for repairing a chipped tooth. I’ll list them from most expensive to most affordable. You can click on each link to learn more.

You’ll have the same problem with porcelain crowns that we discussed above regarding porcelain veneers. However, this also will require grinding down a great deal of healthy tooth structure. Rarely do I suggest that.

Additionally, your son has experienced tooth trauma. You need to schedule an emergency appointment with your dentist so he can check for nerve damage and can take steps to deal with that, if necessary.

Dental bonding is the standard treatment for chipped teeth and it is a lot more affordable. While it will have to be updated every once in a while, it will hold up much better on a growing jaw because of its design.

Because dental bonding is done freehand, you will want to make sure you have an artistic cosmetic dentist to do the procedure.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.

Will an Emergency Dentist Charge the Cause of the Accident?

I was at a stag party. We were at a pub when one of the group got a little too drunk. He started trouble which ended up causing a fight. The result of which was my front tooth lost a piece and is now loose. I’m assuming I need an emergency dentist, but I’m broke. Will the dentist charge the fee to the moron who started all this?

Casey C.

Dear Casey,

A chipped tooth in need of an emergency dentist
Tooth trauma requires an emergency dental visit

I’m very sorry this happened to you. It’s hard when you’re trying to be responsible and the people around you cause problems. You’re right that this needs an emergency dentist. Your loose tooth needs to be splinted to stabilize it. There are several ways a dentist can do this. What method he or she uses will depend on what other issues your tooth is facing.

He’ll also want to examine it for trauma to the nerves or pulp. Internal damage could mean a root canal treatment and possible crown.

Once the tooth is secure, if there’s no other damage you can fix the broken piece with dental bonding. You don’t have to have the piece that broke. A skilled cosmetic dentist can sculpt a composite resin onto your tooth which will look just like your natural tooth structure and blend in perfectly.

Who Pays for Emergency Dental Care?

Unless the person responsible comes and agrees to pay for treatment, the dentist can’t bill him. He can only bill the person receiving the services or their legal guardian without prior approval. However, you can ask for a detailed bill of the damage and send the bill to the offender. If he has integrity he may just pay. If he doesn’t, you may have to take him to small claims court.

Just be aware, many dentists are willing to work with patients financially, especially those in emergency situations. Just talk to the dentist ahead of time. If he’s not willing to work with you, try Care Credit, though most dentists offer that in-office. It’s a medical credit card that has low and even no-interest payments.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Randall Burba.